The Straight Talk About The Straight Ticket

 

Thank you Democrat straight ticket voters.  Thanks for all you have done to help our society.  I understand you wanted “change” and you were willing to wear Go Obama stickers and chant and scream and faint whenever HE spoke—but in the process you forgot one little thing—your own laziness.

I’m sorry up front–I know accusing people of negative things is so out and calling people out on their choices is so last year–but in communities all over the Country where people yanked the straight ticket they ended up voting for many opportunists like the jolly man pictured above. 

In so doing, many excellent district clerks, judges, tax assessors, school board members, mayors, sheriffs and other local republican politicians that were doing a great job for their communities were swept away by the tsunami of straight ticket votes.

Why vote straight ticket?  Laziness.  Very few people vote straight ticket because they have examined each candidate in each race and decided to vote all Republican or all Democrat.  I am about as right-wing as I can be and even I, yes I voted race by race.  If I did not know either candidate, I left it blank, and in 2 instances I actually voted for (gasp) a democrat! 

I’ll never tell which ones–but trust me, I did.

So you don’t think there is any harm in straight ticket voting–the lever for the lazy?  Take the local case of Devon Anderson.

Devon is the current Criminal District Court Judge for the 177th Judicial District Court in Harris County, Texas (Houston for those of you in other states).  Devon was a long-time prosecutor and is a person untouchable integrity.  She has been an amazing Judge and has done wonderful things for our community.  I know of almost no lawyers from the DEFENSE BAR that dislike her.  She is fair, honest and tries her best to do the right thing in every case.  But, she was up this last term.  She was beat in a wave of straight ticket voting by Kevin Fine:

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Mr. Fine said he’ll draw from his experiences as a cocaine addict who has been clean and sober for 10 years when presiding over felony cases.  “Every time I was coming down, I felt like the devil was reaching into my soul, stealing my heart,” he said of his days spent with drugs.  See Full Article.
As a side note–Judge Anderson is one of 4 judges who preside over the County’s Drug Courts.  Mr. Fine states, “I ran,” Fine said, “because I felt like I could help more people as a judge than I could one at a time as clients.”  (uh, no you didn’t—the local Dem party had a big meeting and asked for volunteers to run for every bench and you were one of many who said “sure”)
That is sooooooo great!  We want Judges in our Criminal System to “help people” because that is their role–oh no, wait, being an activist and community worker is actually not the goal or the job of a Judge–they are to rule on the law impartially.  Whoops–guess he didn’t know that.
There are so many more examples of this all over our Nation–but hey, maybe this is the “change” people were looking for.  Well congratulations lazy voters–you will get exactly what you asked for–major, heart wrenching, society altering “change.”
After all, straight ticket voting got us change before–remember 1976-1980?  Obama does:
080401-obama-gas-line21
Yea!  Gas lines, hostages, stagflation, high borrowing rates, unemployment—and former drug addicts presiding as Judges in a felony Drug Court–now that is some “change” we need.
Thanks again straight voters–your unintended brilliance is simply amazing.
-Murphy

 

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Explore posts in the same categories: Current Events, Democrats, drugs, election, Government, Law, Life, News, Obama, Politics, Thoughts on the World

6 Comments on “The Straight Talk About The Straight Ticket”

  1. Josh Maxwell Says:

    I found your blog on google and read a few of your other posts. I just added you to my Google News Reader. Keep up the good work. Look forward to reading more from you in the future.

  2. Fish Says:

    I’m still struggling with this, especially since I did the research and looked into all the races on my ballot. Yeah, it takes time, but I could be completely confident in my endorsements.

    This is what really makes me cry:

    http://www.howobamagotelected.com/

    -f

  3. pcorcoran Says:

    There are two things that push my electoral buttons: I don’t approve of the election of judges, and I don’t approve of public referendums* which address fiscal policy or impact apportionment. Both are invitations to indulge the stupidity of the herd-voter.

    The events you cite above are a great reason why electing judges is d-u-m dumb. Instead, make them appointed for life by the highest executive officer of their jurisdiction. Make their impeachment/censure subject to public referendum of a suitably significant percentage (say, 2/3rds of voters) so as to discourage frivolous “ballot gambling”.

    Remove judicial elections and Devon Anderson (who is hot, btw) keeps her post. The Honorable Kevin Fine remains less honorable until such a time as he has enough experience not to be an embarrassment to the executive who appoints him. Problem solved.

    (*With apologies to Paula Harris.)

  4. mklasing Says:

    Fish: Even if you voted all democrat, I’d say Bravo–because you looked into the races and made an educated decision–that is the point. So—Bravo!

    Pat: I agree with you on the judge thing–it drives me crazy–if we are going to elect them, then they should not be allowed to affiliate with a party–just simply let them all run together, have run-offs and let them campaign on who they are. At least in that system a straight voting ticket would not cast a vote for any of them. But ultimately–electing them is ridiculous. Your system is perfect–I’d vote for it. And yes–Devon is easy on the eyes.

  5. Cecil Says:

    Murphy, Patrick-

    I’ve thought that electing judges was stupid for 20+ years, and 1994 and 2008 just confirm it.

    Were I dictator for a day, what I’d set up for judgeships would be something like a commission to develop a list of suitable candidates for open judgeships – based on objective measures like time as an attorney, continuing education, certifications, and so on – Murphy would know more about what would be relevant. I wouldn’t let the commission ask questions about purely political issues, so no “As a municipal court judge, how would you rule on cases involving…” questions. I think the commission would be something from the State Bar.

    When a spot opens up, the Governor gets to nominate someone from that list. He or she can use any rules he or she chooses, but the person has to have the minimal qualifications the commission requires.

    When you’re nominated, you serve a defined term. Maybe 4 or 6 years? After that time, your name goes on the ballot. The question would be something like “Should John S. Doe continue as Judge of the 1,234,567,890 State District Court? Yes/No.”

    A supermajority of “No,” and the governor picks your replacement.

    How’s that sound? It’s not far off of Patrick’s idea…

  6. Jon Coltrane Says:

    Bad Idea Cecil…we definitely don’t need our run amuck gov.perry appointing any more judges than he already does. I take issue with anyone who says criminal judges are there to solely rule impartially on the law. That is bogus. Criminal judges can and should exercise their discretion and leniency is one of the tools employed at a Judge’s discretion based on the facts and circumstances of each particular case. Juries are supposed to listen and weigh evidence and then determine whether or not to find a criminal defendant guilty or not guilty. I’ve seen a lot of juries get it wrong and essentially convict on flimsy at best evidence. If a criminal defendant were to then go before the judge for sentencing, guess what? they are allowed to exercise discretion…and I don’t think it is wrong to have judges on our bench that have suffered and endured through hardships – including addiction. He has stood in the shoes of others and that in my opinion can be a great asset.


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